Archive for the Monsters Category

Weird Video of the Week

Posted in Children, Humor, Monsters with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 20, 2015 by Stephanie Selby

It’s been damn near two months since I posted anything! Where the hell have I been? Getting caught up in work and personal activities, so at least drama is not the cause. I’ve been swimming a lot and losing weight lately so that’s a plus, but I know I need to refocus myself and realize what’s really important. Scaring the crap out of people!

I know, I deserve to burn in the deepest pits of internet hell for this period of absence, but allow me to beg forgiveness and see if I can muster up a better work ethic. Fingers crossed…

In any case here’s a piece offering for now. Trust me, you will need your choice of alcoholic beverage afterwards.

Advertisements

Creepypasta Critique: Smile Dog

Posted in Animals, Creepypasta, Monsters, Narrations, Review, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on December 23, 2014 by Stephanie Selby

Smile Dog is sure to floss the flesh out of his teeth every day!

Who doesn’t love this deranged dog? I suppose those of us not haunted by him!

In any case, Smile Dog is a creepypasta staple, one of the very well known tales that serve as a great introduction to this internet-based genre. Those of you who are unfamiliar can read the entire pasta here, or you can listen to my own narration of Smile Dog on YouTube.

The basic plot starts with a young writer looking to interview a woman by the name of Mary E. to get a good story. However, their meeting proves disastrous as she becomes hysterical and refuses to talk at all. It seems as if the writer came out of there with nothing, but one day he receives a letter from the same woman some time after her untimely death.

The cause of her dismay is a peculiar picture she saw on the internet. One that when viewed will cause the terrible photo’s subject to harass the viewer until they ‘spread the word.’ That would be showing the same picture to others.

It’s an instant classic because of the story’s ability to tempt us with our innate curiosity. I’m certain there’s a little part of all of us that want to take a peek at Smile Dog’s picture. Just to see what it’s like, just to see if the curse is true. If it is, all we have to do to cure ourselves is to show the picture to someone else, right?

Smile Dog is also helped by Mary’s character, as she is an honorable woman who struggles with the moral implications of what passing this curse on to others could entail. Even though she does die, her efforts seem successful. She doesn’t spread the word to anyone else. In my personal opinion, she beat that damn dog! A bittersweet kind of victory.

I think this story continues to survive because Smile Dog requires one thing that the internet is all too familiar with: the ability to share and spread all types of information. So often stories, videos, chain letters, go viral and we’re all exposed to whatever the internet has to offer. Usually this is  a good thing for us; we can now quickly research different subjects or keep up with the latest news. The internet can help improve ourselves or at the very least (such as with silly cat videos) brighten our day.

However information can be harmful to us. You could find out over Facebook that your spouse is cheating on you. A terrorist could find directions on how to make a bomb. You could be completely misinformed by someone who is spreading false or inaccurate information. You could be cursed by viewing a picture a friend sent you.

Sharing information like this was harder to do when Mary was first affected by the picture, as the internet didn’t have the capabilities that it does now. But the author wants to pass the torch to his audience, so what kind of spread could we expect to see with the modern internet? The possibilities should fill you with dread. It does for me.

Perhaps it’s the reason why I’m spreading the word, so to speak. You might want to consider doing that too.

The Babadook: Grief Monster

Posted in Children, Family, Film, Horror, Monsters, Movies, Review, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on December 2, 2014 by Stephanie Selby

The-Babadook

You can guess what movie I just watched! And it’s about time too. Seems like this film has been released everywhere except the U.S. I wanted to see this flick so much, it was starting to drive me nuts (though not as crazy as Amelia).

Amelia’s a lonely widow living with her son, Samuel. He’s a difficult child, making his own weapons and talking about killing monsters – even to the point where he’s pulled out of school. To make matters worse, his birthday is coming up, which also coincides with the death of his father, Amelia’s lost husband. It’s a very stressful time in their household.

Which is made even worse by the inexplicable appearance of a strange pop-up book titled “Mister Babadook.” It tells the story of a monster by the same name. It terrifies Sam and sets him on an obsessive path to try to protect both himself and his mother from the creature. Amelia’s closer inspection shows the book predicting horrible things happening, things that she will do to her child.

Amelia tries to convince her son the monster isn’t real, but strange occurrences prove otherwise. Will mother and son be able to contend with the Babadook? Or will they find themselves overwhelmed?

It’s spooky, it’s smart, and tells a gut-wrenching story that left my stomach in knots.  Those who prefer a faster paced film or expecting a straight-up monster movie will be disappointed; The Babadook is not that kind of film. The slow tension is well worth it though, as we get to know Amelia and her son so well while they’re tormented, which only ups the ante emotionally. A horror movie is so much better when you actually give a damn about the characters.

In fact, I enjoyed the film so much that I pre-ordered my very own copy of the pop-up book shown in the film. It just hope it reaches the minimum amount of orders so it’ll actually get printed. Fingers crossed!

Okay, so I’d like to get in a little deeper at this point. I’ll be discussing different plot points throughout the film. If you’re wary of spoilers, DON’T READ PAST THIS POINT. You’ve been warned!

So, I imagine it’s safe to say that this monster is a personification of grief. It’s very clear that Amelia is still dealing with the loss of her husband, even after six years. Sam doesn’t get to celebrate his birthday on the proper date because it’s the same as his father’s death, and Amelia keeps all his old things down in their cellar. This grief leaves them very isolated from other people as they’re unable to connect with family or create new relationships.

As Amelia’s grief starts to overwhelm her, the tension builds and the Babadook makes himself known. This is especially true when Amelia’s mental state starts deteriorating and she gets ‘possessed.’ Grief-stricken people often lash out, even at the ones they love. There is a monster inside her, but it’s her own emotions that make her act out.

They say you can’t get rid of the Babadook, and that makes total sense if he and grief are one and the same. Those who have suffered the loss never really get over it. That pain will always be with them, and Amelia and her son are no exception. The solution is simple: you learn to live with it. It becomes a part of you and your daily life that you acknowledge and look after. In Amelia’s case that means keeping it in your basement and feeding it bugs from the garden, but hey, people often deal with their grief in strange ways!

Perhaps in a way all are secretly looking after a babadook of our own. How do you live with yours?

Weird Video of the Week

Posted in Children, Film, Monsters, Updates, Weird Videos with tags , , , , , , , , on August 1, 2014 by Stephanie Selby

Sorry for the lack of posts recently. I’ve been going through some minor health problems lately, and unfortunately I’ll be going through surgery in the near future. Don’t worry though! I’ll still be here to bring you the creepy content you deserve.

If things go according to plan, I’ll be sharing with you all a video entry for a contest on Youtube! It’s going to be very special, so I hope you’ll enjoy it.

In the meantime let me share with you another video from my collection. Have a wonderful weekend.

Disturbing Sea Creatures

Posted in Animals, Monsters, Science, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 3, 2014 by Stephanie Selby

Ever since I started learning how to swim, I’ve been on a bit of a water kick. In this short time I’ve visited a couple of aquariums, gone beach combing more often, and started watching ocean creature documentaries on the Discovery Channel when I get the chance. Granted, the goal of this blog isn’t to showcase to beauty of the ocean, so the only solution is to reveal that it can be a very scary place. Just as H.P. Lovecraft so clearly understood!

Below is a list of creatures that will make you stick to the shore this summer!

pelican-eelThe Umbrella Mouth Gulper Eel, or Pelican Eel – This disturbing looking creature is actually a deep-dwelling fish that fishermen occasionally drag up in their nets. It’s large mouth suggests that it’s able to swallow meals much bigger than itself, but inspected stomachs generally contain small crustaceans. It even has an organ on the end of it’s tail that can glow pink or red to lure prey. It lives in the temperate and tropical waters of all oceans at a depth of about 1,600 to 9,800 feet.

Anglerfish Anglerfish – It’s not enough that these little monstrosities live in the deep, deep sea luring smaller fish to their death, oh no! What’s really creepy is some anglerfish species practice a chilling form of parasitic reproduction. Males are born much smaller and underdeveloped than their female counterparts and cannot live for long on their own, so once they do find a female they bite down on her skin, releasing an enzyme that breaks tissues down and fuses them together at the blood vessel level. This is all to ensure that the female has an available mate when she is ready to spawn. Sounds lovely doesn’t it?

MolamolaMola Mola or Ocean Sunfish – This intimidating species is the heaviest boney fish known to man. It’s diet mostly consists of jellyfish, and lives in temperate to tropical ocean waters throughout the world. While not the scariest creature on the list, it’s odd shape and large size convinced me to include it.

 

Light-Fantastic-viperfish-7Viperfish – This genus of fish are well known for the needle-like teeth on their lower jaw, which gives them their ghastly appearance and makes them one of the fiercest predators in the ocean. These guys are thought to be able to live 30 to 40 years in deep temperate or tropical waters. Like the angler fish and the pelican eel, this fish has a light producing organ with which to lure prey.

 

ProboscusWormProboscis Worm or Nemertea – No, nobody spilled their intestines on the ocean floor, it’s just a phylum of invertebrates that happens to be named after a sea nymph from legend. Like many types of invertebrates, when this worm is cut or broken up the pieces will eventually grow into separate animals.

 

vampire-squid

Vampire Squid – The scientific name for this deep-sea creature literally means ‘vampire squid from Hell.’ Fortunately, it’s not literally a vampire; it was given that name due to the webbing between its tentacles which looks like a cloak, as well as its red or black coloring. This squid is able to live in waters with as little as 3% oxygen, a feat that few animals are able to do.

 

Basking Shark – Only second to the whale shark in terms of size, the basking shark has often been mistaken for the great white shark. Ovbiously from the picture, the basking shark has a distinct difference from it other shark kin. Even though that gaping maw is a jaw dropper, (sorry for the pun!) these guys are harmless to humans.

 

640px-Hapalochlaena_lunulata2Blue Ringed Octopus – As cute as this little guys are, they’re also one of the most venomous creatures in the sea. They’re mostly located in coral reefs of the Pacific and Indian oceans, and are fairly docile until provoked. The octopus’s venom consists primarily of a neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin, which can cause major paralysis and respiratory failure. A human can die within minutes if not given immediate attention and there is no anitvenom; patients just have to be put on a ventilator and wait for the venom to leave their body.

 

blobfish1Blobfish – These fish may look pretty normal at a depth of 2000 to 3,900 feet, but bring one up to the surface and this is what you get. It’s often accidentally caught by bottom trawling nets, and there’s a concern that this fish may become an endangered species. This thing is so darn ugly it’s the mascot of the Ugly Animal Preservation Society, a group dedicated to saving all the ugly animals that we humans tend to ignore.

Weird Video of the Week

Posted in Animation, Monsters, Music, Short Stories, Weird Videos with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 25, 2014 by Stephanie Selby

For this week, I’m sharing an intriguing little music video that offers quite a twist. It has a lot of views, it demands to be seen repeatedly. Enjoy!

 

Creepypasta Critique: Invasive Species

Posted in Animals, Apocalypse, Creepypasta, Monsters, Review with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 25, 2014 by Stephanie Selby
Kudzu is a great example of a real invasive specie, It's a plan that overtakes many areas in the American South.

Kudzu is a great example of a real invasive specie, It’s an Asian plant that overtakes many areas in the American South.

I think I may have created a monster…

A few weeks ago, I introduced my sister to Slimebeast’s short story “Invasive Species,” and she hasn’t stopped bugging me about it since. You may have already noticed that I’ve done a narration of the story as she requested, and now she wants me to give it a more in-depth treatment. I only oblige her because I’ve been struggling to find a good subject for this week, so we’ll all just have to bear with her for now.

It’s understandable why she would be so interested. In college she majored in biology, so the basis for the mutants resonates with her scientific knowledge – especially evolution. As humans with longer lifespans and generations, we don’t get to witness developments in our species in the same way as bacteria or bugs, which breed quickly and have shorter generations. Scientists often observe small bacteria adapt and become antibiotic-resistant or bugs develop immunity to pesticides. In “Invasive Species” the audience gets to see the results of human adaptation at warp speed.

Many people think that evolution is a process that makes organisms more and more advanced. This simply isn’t true, as the vast majority of mutations are harmful to an organism. It’s only tiny percentage of mutations that offer some kind of advantage. Natural selection chooses an organism’s qualities in terms of adaptability, survivability, and the ability to pass on genes to the next generation. This might mean that a species may have to become less complex in order to adapt and survive. One need only look at the dinosaurs; they’re the genetic ancestors of birds. Evolution doesn’t often choose intelligence as an adaptive trait either – it’s just a fluke in human development. In reality evolution is a real bitch.

What really leaves us both wondering about this story is why would scientists develop such a potent serum in the first place. It might be in response to an infertility epidemic but the true reasons are never made clear. I was at a loss in regards to an explanation. With some thought, my sister was able to come up with a theory: an alternative to expensive IVF treatments, as many people in first-world countries suffer from low fertility because of chemicals that can cause such issues.

The real question this tale leaves us with is simple: are humans really an invasive species? Were on every continent, encroach on nearly all environments, there’s over seven billion of us, and we consume more resources than any other kind of animal. Scientifically speaking, all signs point to yes.